LATEST NEWS

 JUNE 2017

It’s that time again–the end of the school year, the beginning of the summer season–time for vacations, time off from teaching or playing, or whatever.  Let’s hope that “time off from playing” is not one of the summer pass-times that all of you, and your students, take seriously.

If it’s a new instrument or bow that’s in the cards in the near future, you’re in luck.  I’ve had the opportunity to acquire many instruments in all price ranges.  Attached is the .pdf of the spring flyer, which I will actually send hard copies of to most of your schools, but please feel free to print it and distribute it to your students.

VIOLINS

The owner of Eastman Strings was able to buy about 300 violins from a friend of his who was closing his shop.  They all went through the Eastman workshop for fingerboard dressing and quality ebony pegs, and I was able to snare 25 of them.  They are in a few different grades, priced from $500 to $800, and they all have properly sized necks.

The owner’s daughter showed up in her big white truck, and I picked out some Pietro Lombardi violins, priced at $2000 and Pierre Lupot’s at $1500.  Also arriving and sold immediately was an Albert Nebel cello, made with all European wood, selling at $4000.

The Camillo Callegari violins from Guang Hong are very popular, so I grabbed a bunch of them.  I was very lucky that a fine violinist was in my shop at the time, and she auditioned the instruments for me, rather than the salesman* having to listen to me screech.  A number of Guarneri models were chosen along with a Guadagnini that was especially nice, all priced at $2000.  Also available are the Heritage instruments, which are simply plain wood versions of the heavily flamed and antiqued Callegari’s.  They come in at $1500.  (*sans white truck)

Below $1000 there are many choices, starting at $400 with the new offering from Century Strings.  These violins are made in their own workshop in Beijing, and the tops and backs are mostly arched and graduated by CNC machines, thus keeping the price down while producing a great sounding violin for the money.  I also have some of their C.L. Wynn violins priced at $600 and $800.  Also available are the Kai Yang violins that have been flying out the door in the last 2 years, but the price has gone up slightly to $500.

VIOLAS

Violas have been very popular lately, so I was very happy when the West Coast Strings white truck rolled in.  A number of Paolo Lorenzo wide body violas now line the walls, in sizes from 15″ to 16 1/2″.  These instruments are available in a number of different grades, priced up to $3000, but I have found that the Paolo Lorenzo is the best combination of price vs. sound at a mere $1200.  This is the instrument that is pictured below.

CELLOS

Let’s not forget about cellos!  Gang Shen from Tanglewood Strings pulled in with his white truck, and I bought some more cellos from the workshop of Hua Chang Jun.  They have been a $2000 staple for the last 5 or 6 years, and they keep getting better.  Jian Ming Li, the supplier of one of my $600 violins, is getting into the cello business, and I obtained two examples, priced at $1500 and $2800.

BOWS

The bows from Brazil are still well represented with examples from Arcos Brasil, Horst John, and Buzzato Bows, priced from $350 to $800.  Carbon bows from Glasser and China range from $100 to $450, and there are a number of vintage bows from $500.

SELF PROMOTION

I don’t have to remind you that all of the instruments I sell, no matter how inexpensive, are set up by me. In fact, it seems the cheaper the instrument, the more I have to do to it to make it fit to be sold here. You won’t get instruments set up like this from the internet or from dealers who sell orchestral instruments only as a sideline.  Please impart this to your students and to their parents.  Buying a violin is not like buying an IPad.  The internet is not your friend, and it certainly isn’t mine. When you shop for an item like a violin, where functionality is chief among many other important factors, there is only one logical choice–BUY LOCAL, and buy from a specialist.

 

OLDER SELF PROMOTION

Of course, you can buy entry level outfits for a couple of hundred dollars online or from music stores, but they are not the quality that you deserve, and certainly not the quality that I expect. (My opinion: European entry instruments, although well made, are unacceptable because they are too heavy and do not sound well.)  Have you already bought a bargain online?  If it meets certain parameters of quality, it makes sense for you to have it professionally set up. I’ll be happy to give you an estimate.

All the instruments I sell are set up by me to my exacting standards. You will only find quality Pirastro, Thomastik, or D’Addario strings, the necks are smooth, the playing action is easy, the pegs work well, and I will not sell instruments that don’t sound the very best for their price points. Entry level instruments receive the same care as the $2000 ones. If you have a problem with any instrument I have sold it’s unlikely that you will have to pay to have it fixed for the first three years of ownership (basic maintenance and accidental damage excluded). Reliability is probably the most important factor in choosing an instrument at the dealer level, and my 46 years of experience allows me to choose only the best instruments and bows for my clientele–ones that I can stand behind (and cases that I can stand on).

 

Look here for a list of the latest new instruments: